Why Aren’t Americans Moving?

Americans are moving at a historically low rate, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

The percentage of Americans moving over a one-year period fell to an all time low in the United States to 11.2 percent in 2016.

Of those who moved, 42.2 percent said they moved for a housing-related reason, such as wanting a new or better home/apartment.

In comparison, 27.4 percent said they moved for a family-related reason, 20.2 percent said they moved for an employment-related reason, and 10.2 percent said they moved for some other reason.

Among regions, the South saw the greatest number of people moving out (901,000), but also saw the largest inflow of people moving into the region (940,000). The inflows and outflows of the region are not statistically different from each other.

The highest mover rates by race were for the black or African-American alone population (13.8 percent) and the Asian alone population (13.4 percent).

These two mover rates were not statistically different. The white alone population moved at a rate of 10.3 percent. The Hispanic or Latino population (12.6 percent) were more mobile than the non-Hispanic white population (9.8 percent).

The white alone population moved at a rate of 10.3 percent. The Hispanic or Latino population (12.6 percent) were more mobile than the non-Hispanic white population (9.8 percent).

So, why aren’t we moving as much these days?

“People in the United States are still moving, just not to the same extent as they did in the past,” David Ihrke said, a survey statistician in the Journey-to-Work and Migration Statistics Branch. “The decision to move can be personal and contextual. What causes one person to move might not be enough to convince another.”

Maybe, after more than two centuries of moving around, Americans are finally getting cozy where they are. Blame big-screen TVs.

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