How Much Sugar Should We Eat?

Most Americans have no idea how much daily sugar intake is considered healthy, a new survey reveals.

Health information website Healthline.com said it surveyed more than 3,000 Americans on their attitudes, habits and knowledge on the effects of sugar on the body.

Using the American Heart Association’s recommended daily allowances for sugar consumption Healthline’s survey found that most people are eating too much sugar but don’t know how to cut back.

Two out of three survey respondents said that sugar was their main concern (over fat and carbs) and admit they need to reduce their sugar intake.

Many told the survey takers that they feel guilty about eating sugar but their answers show that they don’t fully understand how much sugar is contained in their foods, nor do they fully comprehend the role of sugar in physical addiction.

(Just so you know, the daily allowance for men is 36 grams/9 teaspoons/150 calories, while for women it’s just 24 grams/6 teaspoons/100 calories.)

The amount of sugar that is considered “too much” has not been engrained into the minds of most consumers as it has for other nutrition facts such as total calories, carbs, and fat.

Two out of three survey respondents said that sugar was their main concern (over fat and carbs) and admit they need to reduce their sugar intake.

Many told survey takers that they feel guilty about eating sugar but their answers show that they don’t fully understand how much sugar is contained in their foods, nor do they fully comprehend the role of sugar in physical addiction.

Most seek to eat less sugar but fail. The majority of those surveyed admit to eating too much sugar yet 3 out of 4 do not know the recommended amount of added sugar to take in on a daily basis.

Two out of 3 guess wrong on sugar contents of popular foods and 70% don’t know how many grams are in a teaspoon of sugar nor the calorie equivalent.

“Scientific research has shown that along with obesity and tooth decay, sugar is linked to serious illnesses including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. It also can contribute to skin issues, the aging process and be highly addictive,” said David Kopp, CEO of Healthline Media, Inc.

In other words, getting our sugar intake within guidelines is literally a life-and-death struggle.

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