Education and Optimism

The level of education an American has attained is a good predictor of how optimistic, (or pessimistic) he or she is about succeeding in the 21st century economy, according to a new national survey developed by public relations firm Burson-Marsteller.

According to “Making it in America: The View from America,” only 42 percent of Americans with a high school education or less say they have the right skills to succeed in the 21st century, while 71 percent with a college education or more say they do.

When asked what emotion best describes their feeling about the future of the U.S. economy, Americans with high school or less are 25 percent less likely to say they are optimistic than those with a college education or more.

“…Americans with high school or less are 25 percent less likely to say they are optimistic”

And they are 50 percent more likely to feel scared about the future of the U.S. economy than those with a college education or more.

Education level also plays an important role in how Americans feel about the future of the U.S. economy.

Thirty-eight percent of Americans with a college education or more think the American economy is headed in the right direction compared to 30 percent of those with a high school education or less.

When it comes to job security and the role of automation, only 14 percent of Americans with a college education or more say a machine could replace their job in five years, versus 30 percent with a high school education or less.

“most Americans are in agreement that business and government should work together…”

However, most Americans are in agreement that business and government should work together in strengthening the economy.

Fifty-seven percent of Americans say the government should play a major role in strengthening the economy and 86 percent support tax credits for companies that pay for workers to train in other, more modern work skills.

Sixty-one percent say the government should promote job training and education programs for displaced workers to address loss of jobs to automation and machine intelligence.

Twenty-two percent say the government should enact policies to protect those jobs and 10 percent support an increase in corporate taxes to fund programs for displaced workers.

Find out more at www.burson-marsteller.com.

 

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